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Georgetown Animal Services

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Animal Control

Georgetown Animal Services is responsible for animal control and for the animal shelter.  There are four Animal Control Officers who serve the community within the city limits of Georgetown.  These professional officers are experienced, trained and certified.  They respond to a great variety of calls – injured animals, loose dogs, welfare concerns, nuisance issues, aggressive animals, and neighborhood complaints.

Officers respond to calls seven days a week during business hours and are also on call for after-hour emergencies that meet call-out criteria.  Because they are sent on calls by Georgetown Police Dispatchers, your phone call will be answered 24 / 7, whereas the animal shelter does not operate 24 / 7 and is focused on the animals at the shelter.

Frequently Asked Questions
All of these questions can be answered with: call Animal Control at 512-930-3510 x 6!
My neighbor’s cat bit me. Can you test it for rabies?
If you are bitten by a dog, cat, or wildlife, contact Animal Control at 512-930-3510 x6.  Any time that dogs, cats, or some wildlife break skin with their teeth, State law requires that certain protocols be followed as a precaution against rabies.  Officers will take a report and advise you of what to do next.
There is a raccoon (or other wildlife) in my house. What should I do?
Call Animal Control at 512-930-3510 x6.  An officer will come to the building to assess the situation and potentially capture the animal or leave a trap. An ACO will assess the animal and determine the best outcome – release it into the wild, transfer to wildlife rescue, or humanely euthanize. In some situations, it may be necessary to contact a pest control or private trapping company to remove the animal.
Something is digging up my yard. Will Animal Control set up a trap?

Animal Control does not set up traps for nuisance wildlife. Contact a pest control or private trapping company to advise you.

There’s an injured deer in the neighborhood. How can I help it?
Call Animal Control at 512-930-3510 x6 to report the location and other details. An officer will assess the animal and determine the best outcome.
I’m concerned about a dog that is left outside all the time. Can Animal Control help?
Perhaps. Call Animal Control at 512-930-3510 x6. Officers will determine if the animal is being cared for in accordance with local and State ordinances.
I found a baby bird! What do I do?

Spring weather always brings an influx of calls about baby animals. As cute as they are, most of the time, the best thing to do if you find them is leave them alone.  If you think an animal is injured or are sure it is orphaned, you can call Animal Control at 512-930-3510 x6.  A local wildlife organization, All Things Wild Inc., has advice for handling different types of found animals: http://allthingswildrehab.org/found-an-animal/.

A stray cat had kittens in my yard. What should I do with them?

If you are willing, it is best to leave the mother cat and kittens alone, at least until they are older and begin to wean. Then an ACO can reassess the situation and possibly set a trap for momma and kittens. Removing the kittens and bringing them to the shelter them isn’t always the best or safest choice for the kittens’ health.

  • Look around for mom and littermates: Sometimes well-meaning people unknowingly separate kittens from their mother. Ultimately, the goal is to keep baby kittens with their mother for as long as possible for their best chance of survival.  The mortality rate for kittens separated from their mothers is higher than if they had been kept together.
  • Observe from a distance: If the kittens are safe but mom is nowhere in sight, you should quietly observe from a distance so as not to scare away a shy or feral mother. The mother will usually stay with her babies for one to two days after giving birth.  After that, she may leave for short periods to hunt for food or to look for a safer location for her litter.  Mother cats will instinctively start moving their young one by one to a new location to ensure the safety of the litter.
  • If kittens are clean, plump and sleeping quietly, chances are mom isn’t far away and you are better off leaving them alone.
  • If you are unsure, you can always request to speak to an ACO by calling 512-930-3510 x6.
How can I get some assistance with trapping?
Trapping services are provided on a case by case basis.  Generally, if an animal is injured or sick, an ACO will attempt to trap it.  Please call 512-930-3510 x6 to speak with an ACO for your specific request.
I saw a dog in a car outside a store. Isn’t that dangerous?

Yes, it can be dangerous. When you see a dog in what you believe to be a hot car, do the following:

  • Take down the information of the vehicle (Make, Model, Color and License Plate) and the location
  • Get a description of the dog and be prepared to articulate what the dog is doing, e.g panting, drooling, etc.
  • Call police dispatch at 512-930-3510 x6 and ask for animal control.  These types of concerns are considered priority call and an ACO will investigate.
  • Please do not stand too close to the vehicle. A stranger too close to the car (dog’s territory) can cause additional distress.
A barking dog keeps me up at night. What are my options?

If you know the address where the dog lives, Animal Control is able to issue a warning to inform them about the complaint.  If the problem persists, you will need to file a civil complaint at Municipal Court. Animal Control can tell you how to file a complaint.

There are several cats running around in my neighborhood. Is that allowed?

City ordinance permits cats to be free roaming. However, the cat must be altered (spayed or neutered) and have a current rabies vaccine and city license. Call 512-930-3510 x6 for additional information.

If you have a question not listed here, please email animalsvc@georgetown.org.



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